MaverickPR asks Nebraska PRSA members to sponsor a YES backpack

Membership, Opportunities, What's NewNo Comments

MaverickPR, the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s PRSSA chapter is seeking help from Nebraska PRSA to fill 100 backpacks with clothing and hygiene supplies to Youth Emergency Services (YES), a local nonprofit that serves homeless and at-risk youth.

For only $35, PRSA members or their companies can sponsor a backpack in the “Say YES: Give Back with a Pack” drive that runs throughout the month of November.

The UNO’s PRSSA chapter has purchased 100 backpacks through its own fundraising but needs more assistance to fill them with such items as packages of socks and underwear, gloves or mittens, body wash, soap, shampoo, conditioner, toothpaste, tooth brushes and first aid items. Checks should be made out to UNO-PRSSA and mailed in care of
Karen Weber, PRSSA faculty adviser at Room 140, Arts and Sciences Hall, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 6001 Dodge St., Omaha, NE 68182-0112.

For more than 35 years YES has served struggling youth, ages 12 to 21 in Omaha and Council Bluffs, by providing critically needed resources that empower them to become self-sufficient. YES served more than 800 homeless and at-risk youth in 2010-11 alone through shelter and advocacy programs.

Please contact Angela Eastep, PRSSA service director, for more information at aeastep@unomaha.edu.

Shoo the Flu – Bailey Lauerman

Opportunities, Professional Development, Resources, Uncategorized, What's NewNo Comments

Imagine a well-known CEO on a mission to have every child in his community receive a flu shot. For free. In a matter of a month.

Now imagine the community is the populous San Francisco Bay Area, with literally hundreds of thousands of children of all socio-economic class.

So, how do you reach and influence parents to allow their children to receive a free flu shot? And how do you turn them into advocates, spreading the word, so that other parents follow suit? And how do you do it while remaining an anonymous donor?

First things first: find partners with the know-how to make it happen –one that can assist with the logistics of the program, and the other to produce creative, persuasive communication that delivers a credible argument to vaccinate in an approachable and relevant way.

For the logistics part, the donor contacted TotalWellness, a national corporate health and wellness provider, to assist with the implementation of the program. TotalWellness contacted Bailey Lauerman to help spread the word.

To make things even more interesting, Bailey Lauerman had only one week to develop, launch and promote the free flu shot program in a large metropolitan area with an equally large Spanish-speaking population. With no paid advertising and no on-the-ground support.

An area that’s already saturated with messaging in every nook and cranny.

Though it was an unusually tight deadline, Bailey Lauerman had the expertise to develop and execute a killer campaign that reached a fairly large audience through social and PR channels. One that delivered a message of education and entertainment, convincing each and every parent of the benefits of childhood flu vaccinations, while arming them with what they needed to spread the word in a non-preachy way.

In a short amount of time, our very talented and capable team developed:

  • A catchy name, Shoo the Flu, identity, flu characters, stickers and shareable social badges
  • A landing page to serve as the central hub for information that included a map of the Target Pharmacy® locations administering the shots, as well as flu myth busters and frequently asked questions – ShooTheFlu.org
  • Facebook and Google+ pages
  • Partnerships with key public schools and non-profits serving children
  • Information distribution channels through local and state health departments
  • Media buzz by pitching timely pieces as a national influenza story was breaking
  • Stories that caught the attention of influential bloggers, including “mommy bloggers” in both the pro- and anti-vaccine camps
  • Posters that were translated to Spanish in order to reach a wider demographic

Then, on the eve of the launch, the anonymous donor decided to be way less anonymous. We needed a communication strategy to attribute this grand community health gesture to Google CEO Larry Page and his wife, Lucy, through their Page Family Foundation. No problem.

The program launched without a hitch on December 1, 2012.

So how did it do? In the first week, Shoo The Flu was covered by some of the area’s most prominent newspapers and TV stations – San Francisco Chronicle; the local NPR affiliate, KQED-FM; Univision 14 KDTV-TV, a Hispanic-speaking television station.

It reached more than 31,000 Facebook users. Daily Shoo The Flu posts were shared on Google+ and Facebook, including one post shared by Larry Page on Google+.

In just a month, 1,500 flu shots were administered –that’s more than 20 times the normal amount of shots.

The campaign was so successful, the Pages decided to extend the free flu shots for another month.

By the end of the second month, a total of 4,865 shots were administered.

The campaign then went to exceed even more expectations by winning Best Social Media Campaign from Ragan’s 2013 PR Daily Awards, along with two honorable mentions for Best Cause-Related Campaign and Best Community Relations Campaign.

You have to admit, that’s some pretty good shooing of the flu.

A Refreshed Brand Can Build Consumer Confidence

Luncheon Presentations, Membership, Opportunities, Professional Development, ResourcesNo Comments

By Linyu Huang

With fast changes every day such as industry development, government regulation changes, corporation merge and acquisition, etc. updating brand is crucial to reengaging the current customers and attracting new ones. Sometimes branding just needs refreshing, while sometimes it needs a bit of a jolt. Even a strong brand must stay relevant to survive.

Kathy Broniecki, partner and chief strategy officer with Envoy and Andy Williams, director of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Nebraska shared their brand cases at the May PRSA Nebraska luncheon. Broniecki talked about the agency’s re-branding experience with Roberts Dairy and Hiland Dairy. Williams discussed the process of refreshing a 40-year-old brand, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Nebraska, to meet the needs of and appeal to today’s health insurance consumer.
Why Change?
Broniecki’s agency Envoy has worked with Robert Dairy for more than 25 years. In 1981, Prairie Farms purchased Roberts Dairy and Hiland Dairy Two years ago, Hiland Dairy acquired Roberts Dairy. The two different brands of dairy operated in 11 state market areas with two different websites, consumer campaigns, and brand marketing budgets. In order to create a strong, unified brand across the Midwest and to save on product labeling and marketing costs, Roberts Dairy was renamed to Hiland Dairy.

In the case of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Nebraska, the company had already built one of the most recognized and respected brands in the country. The challenge came when the health insurance industry changed with federal health care law. Blue Cross and Blue Shield had been primarily a business to business company insured through employers. A major shift occurred when more individuals began to buy their own health insurance. To meet consumers’ needs, Blue Cross Blue Shield adjusted its marks, logo, and market strategies to become a more direct consumer company.

 

How to Change?
In Broniecki’s case, the team changed the name on the logo but kept it looking similar to the previous one to be recognizable for customers. They also unified the websites and planned consumer campaign. The vital part is to reach the consumers and deliver the message. The key message is that the only change was the name on the package. The Hiland Dairy would continue to provide fresh hometown dairy with no antibiotics or artificial growth hormones, Broniecki explains. The team used traditional, digital and social media in creating an interactive campaign to deliver the message.

In Williams’ case, the team simplified the logo to a blue cross, a blue shield and capitalized Nebraska to show it as a brand for everyone in Nebraska not just for employees. “Nowadays, people don’t read, especially on the Internet, they scan,” Williams says. “We have to grasp their eyes in three seconds.” The team also adjusted the marketing strategy from general brand promotion to direct consumer promotion. Unlike Broniecki’s case, they applied the new logo directly without any advertisement because it was a small shift and the brand was already well known.

 

Employees Are the Ambassadors
In both Broniecki and Williams’ cases, they involved employees as part of the re-branding process. Employees are one of the most challenging parts of Broniecki’s case. “Long term employees really had a difficult time with it, Broniecki says. The team developed a PR plan for employees to accept the new name by telling them the change will not affect their job and would probably improve the work.

Williams worked with employees to test 10 different logos and educated them the re-branding reasons and processes. “They are the best ambassadors to reach their friends, families, people they know,” Williams says. “They need to present themselves differently after the change.”

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